Nainon Mein Sapna Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

Sridevi

The untimely demise of Sridevi at the age of 54 on February 24, 2018 has struck fans of Indian cinema across the globe. Today, in honor of Sridevi’s legacy, we present the lyrics and English translation to “Nainon Mein Sapna” from her first superhit Bollywood film Himmatwala (1983).

Sridevi’s acting career began at the age of four and would go on to include 300 films over the span of more than four decades. As an actress in South Indian language films, Sridevi’s early performances highlight her capacity to portray nuanced roles without the glamor and glitz that pervaded the Bollywood industry. Sridevi’s first foray into the world of Hindi cinema as a leading lady occurred in Solva Sawan (1979), but her rise to Bollywood stardom occurred as the heroine in K. Raghavendra Rao’s Himmatwala (1983), a Hindi remake of the Telegu film Ooruki Monagadu.

Regarding her early success with Himmatwala, Sridevi has said in a 1987 interview:

In Tamil films they love to see me act naturally. But in Hindi films all they want is lot of glamour, richness and masala. My bad luck was that my first big hit in Hindi films turned out to be a commercial one (Himmatwala). When I did a character role in Sadma, the picture flopped. So people started casting me only for glamour roles. But one day I’m going to prove to everyone that I can act also.

Following Himmatwala, Sridevi had a string of Bollywood hits in the 1980s and ’90s, soon becoming one of the most sought after actresses in the industry. Some of her most notable works include Mr. India (1987), Chandni (1989), Chaalbaaz (1989), Lamhe (1991) and Khuda Gawah (1992). After a 15-year hiatus following her controversial marriage to Boney Kapoor, Sridevi made an endearing comeback in English Vinglish (2012) as a Hindi-speaking housewife who takes on learning English for the first time in Manhattan. Most recently, Sridevi starred in Mom (2017) as a vigilante mother who avenges the rape of her daughter, which was the actress’s 300th and final appearance on screen before her death.

With her unparalleled charisma and signature big eyes, Sridevi won the hearts of millions of fans across the world. Given her massive popularity and exceptional body of work, she is widely considered to be Bollywood’s first female superstar. As we mourn the untimely loss of an icon, we send our heartfelt condolences to Sridevi’s family during this difficult time.

Do you have a favorite song featuring Sridevi? Let us know in the comments!

-Mr. ’55

Sridevi

Nainon Mein Sapna: Lyrics and English Translation

LATA: naino.n me.n sapnaa
In my eyes, there is a dream.
sapno.n me.n sajnaa
In my dreams, I see my beloved. 
sajnaa pe dil aa gayaa
My heart has fallen for my beloved. 
kyo.n sajnaa pe dil aa gayaa?
Why has my heart fallen for my beloved?

kaii albele dekhe
I have seen many unique sights
javaanii ke rele dekhe
I have seen processions of youth.
hasiino.n ke mele dekhe
I have seen gatherings of beautiful women.
dil pe tu hii chhaa gayaa
But it is only you that reigns over my heart.

KISHORE: naino.n me.n sapna
In my eyes, there is a dream.
sapno.n me.n sajnii
In my dreams, I see my beloved.
sajnii pe dil aa gayaa
My heart has fallen for my beloved.
ki sajnii pe dil aa gayaa
My heart has fallen for my beloved.

LATA: tuu nahii.n, mai.n nahii.n
There is not just you or just me.
ab dil ik hai
Our hearts are now united as one.
do tan ik praan, do dil ik jaan
Two bodies with one soul, two hearts with one life.
manzil ik hai
We now have the same destination.  

KISHORE: arre ang se ang mile
Oh! As our bodies unite,
armaa.n khil gaye
our desires have blossomed.
purab paschim se, paschim purab se
From West to East and East to West,
kaise mil gaye
we have met in strange ways.

pyaar ke zamaane mile
I have been given a new world of love,
husn ke khazaane mile
I have been given a beautiful treasure,
jiine ke bahaane mile
I have been given a reason to live,
man me.n jo tuu aa gayaa
Once you entered my heart.

Sridvi

LATA: saanche me.n tere hii
In your mold,
mai.n to Dhal gayii
I shaped myself.
tuu ne toDaa hai, aisaa moDaa hai
You broke and twisted me
ho gayii mai.n nayii
to give me a new shape.

KISHORE: arre saa.nso.n me.n ho.nTho.n pe
Oh! In my breaths and on my lips,
teraa hii naam hai
only your name resides.
lenaa denaa hai kyaa mujhe duniyaa se?
I have nothing to give or take from this world,
tujh se kaam hai
for I am only attached to you.

rangii.n nazaare mile
I have seen colorful sights,
tuufaa.n me.n kinaare mile
I have found the shore amidst a storm,
dil ke sahaare mile
I have found comfort for my heart,
dil me.n jo tuu aa gaya
Once you entered my heart. 

LATA: naino.n me.n sapnaa
In my eyes, there is a dream.
sapno.n me.n sajnaa
In my dreams, I see my beloved. 
sajnaa pe dil aa gayaa
My heart has fallen for my beloved. 
kyo.n sajnaa pe dil aa gayaa?
Why has my heart fallen for my beloved?

Glossary

sapnaa: dream; sajnaa: beloved; albelaa: unique; javaanii: youth; relaa: procession, surge; hasiinaa: beautiful women; melaa: gathering, fair; chhaa jaanaa: to reign, dominate; praan: soul; manzil: destination; ang: body; armaa.n: desire; khil jaanaa: to blossom; purab: East; paschim: West; zamaanaa: world; husn: beauty; khazaanaa: treasure; bahaanaa: reason, excuse; saanchaa: mold; toDnaa: to break; moDnaa: to twist; saa.ns: breath; ho.nTh: lip; lenaa: to take; denaa: to give; kaam: task, obligation; rangii.n: colorful; nazaaraa: sight, scene; tuufaa.n: storm; kinaaraa: shore; sahaaraa: comfort, support.

Sridevi

 

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The 15 Best Bollywood Rain Songs: Evolution of a Classic Genre

Rajesh Khanna and Rakhee Rain Song Bollywood
Rajesh Khanna and Rakhee express their sizzling love in the rain in Shehzada (1972).

It’s monsoon season again in India and, naturally, love is sparkling in the air. At last we present our list of the best rain songs from classic Bollywood! We all adore these moments–the iconic cuddling beneath an umbrella, the splashing around in a wet garden, or of course, Zeenat Aman in a drenched saari. It seems now that singing in the rain is the epitome of Bollywood romance, and a marvelous way to introduce a new song. But this phenomena did not occur overnight, and indeed, the meaning of rain itself in a film has shifted over the years with shifting cultural expectations. Let’s take a look at rain songs in Bollywood over the years!

Shree 420 Raj Kapoor Nargis Pyar Hua Iqrar Hua Rain Song Bollywood
Raj Kapoor and Nargis huddle close together beneath an umbrella in Shree 420 (1955).

We being in the earlier days of cinematic magic. As India awoke to freedom and liberty in the 1950s, so too did the country rapidly begin to shift gears away from pure agriculture and toward industrialization. Many of the best rain songs from that era embody a sense of wonder in urban environments and, matching the film censorship boards, an innocent just-got-struck-by love. In these songs, rain seems to act as that enchantment in the air–that driving force bringing a loved one into contact or sight. Rain too acted as that shimmering veil of restraint that both parties hesitate to cross. “Ek Ladki Bheegi Bhaagi Si” from Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi (1958) is one of the most beloved rain songs of that era!

Raj Kapoor Dum Dum Diga Diga Chhalia
Raj Kapoor prances about the city streets singing “Dum Dum Diga Diga” from Chhalia (1960).

With the advent of the 60s, came a new meaning of being caught in a rainstorm. No longer was rain an innocent effector of love at first sight, but rather a clever and well-understood pretext for full out passion. To clarify, by passion, I mean, symbolic wet dancing that means much more than actual physical contact. The Bollywood rain songs of the 60s exude a sense of joy, independence and confidence. The onset of a rainstorm had an understood implication for overt displays of affection that both parties are eager to demonstrate. Say hello to bouffant hairdos, tight and wet salwar qameezes, and men doing some very special attempts at a courtship dance.

Shammi Kapoor Dil Tera Deewana Hai Sanam Mala Sinha
Shammi Kapoor and Mala Sinha get drenched in Dil Tera Deewana Hai Sanam (1960)

Gone were the days of “Do Bigha Zameen” style agricultural celebration! While the setting of the village recurred, rain ceased to be a blessing for economic survival–instead, it brought the blessing of love between newly liberated men and woman of a new age. Check out our translation of “O Sajna Barkha Bahar” from Parakh (1960) and listen how music directors cleverly incorporated native Indian instruments into creating the sounds and moods of rain. Indeed, the trickling melodies of sitar have graced the introductions of many a great rain sequence–even famously with Ravi Shankar’s solo for Satyajit Rai’s Aparajito!

Asha Parekh Aaya Saawan Jhoom Ke
Dressed as a village belle, Asha Parekh delights in the first rain of the season in “Aaya Sawan Jhoom Ke” (1969).

At last the 70s arrived, and the Bollywood rain song explored new territory. Yes, Zeenat Aman in a wet white saari is crossing some obvious lines and certainly deserves a mention on this list, but the rain song did not merely degenerate into a male fantasy. Instead, as the political atmosphere changed, the rain song adopted a meaning to suit its people. With government dissatisfaction in the air, rain songs were (while maintaining something of a romantic undertone), also a means of escape and hope.

Jeetendra Haye Re Haye Humjoli
Jeetendra and Leena Chandavarkar exhibit some of the strangest and wildest dance moves to date in the famous rain love song of Humjoli (1970)

Did you know in the early days of cinema, rain scenes were not actually filmed in the rain? Because of the nature of unforgiving black-and-white film stock, even heavy pounding natural rain does not appear clearly in the camera–much less the gentle puhaare of many a romantic Bollywood setting. As such, the production staff needed to literally dump buckets of water or spray dozens of hoses above the set for “rain” to actually appear so on screen! So the next time you watch these songs, just imagine the total chaos going on outside the frame among the frantic, water-pouring production assistants!

Zeenat Aman sets the rain on fire in “Haye Haye Yeh Majboori” from Shor (1972).

But enough talk. Now that you know the history, here is our list in chronological order of Bollywood’s greatest rain songs! These all-time classic give an entirely new meaning to “Singin’ in the Rain!”

The Best Rain Songs of Classic Bollywood

  1. Pyar Hua Iqrar Hua (Shree 420 – 1955)
  2. Yeh Raat Bheegi Bheegi (Chori Chori – 1956)
  3. Ek Ladki Bheegi Bhagi Si (Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi – 1958)
  4. Dil Tera Deewana Hai Sanam (Dil Tera Deewana – 1960)
  5. Dum Dum Diga Diga (Chhalia -1960)
  6. O Sajna Barkha Bahar Aayi (Parakh -1960)
  7. Rim Jhim Ke Tarane (Kala Bazaar – 1960)
  8. Zindagi Bhar Nahin Bhoolegi (Barsaat Ki Raat – 1960)
  9. Chhup Gaye Saade Nazare (Do Raaste – 1969)
  10. Aaya Saawan Jhoom Ke (Aaya Saawan Jhoom Ke – 1969)
  11. Ang Lag Ja Balma (Mera Naam Joker – 1970)
  12. Haye Re Haye (Humjoli – 1970)
  13. Bheegi Bheegi Raaton Mein (Ajnabi – 1972)
  14. Paani Re Paani (Shor – 1972)
  15. Haye Haye Yeh Majboori (Roti Kapada Aur Makaan – 1974)
Rajesh Khanna Zeenat Aman Bheegi Bheegi Raaton Mein
Rajesh Khanna cuddles Zeenat Aman to keep warm in the spicy rain song “Bheegi Bheegi Raaton Mein” in Ajnabi (1974).

And there you have it, the 15 best classic Bollywood rain songs over the ages! What are YOUR favorite rain songs from classic Bollywood–and tell us how they’ve influenced your own love stories!

– Mrs. 55

Who Is Mani Rabadi?

You’ve probably never heard of Mani Rabadi, but I’ll bet you’ve seen her work before. A behind-the-scenes legend, Mani Rabadi was a fashion designer to the stars. This woman was the final word in costume design for Bollywood films of the 60s and 70s (even continuing to work until Hum Aapke Hain Kaun in 1994)! If you wanted something run-of-the-mill, Mani Rabadi was not your woman. But if a director wanted something to stand out, to set bold trends, and to wow the audience with glamour, she was the only choice. When you see some of the pictures below, you can readily understand how this silent woman in the background transformed the careers of the stars. Her styles turned actors into icons, and made actresses into idols.

Starting her career in a humble toy factory to help pay tuition, and then joining the Indian People’s Theatre Association, Mani got her first break doing Gujarati films before moving to Bollywood. Here is a gallery of her designs from the movies we all love:

An Evening in Paris (1967)

Sharmila actually plays a dual role in the film. The villainous side incidentally always shows her tummy–just to help the audience keep things straight.
Uhh, what precisely are you looking at Pran?
Cutsy hair clip that’s bigger than my nose? Don’t mind if I do.

Jewel Thief (1967)

I’ve talked a lot about my feelings for Helen in a chicken suit from this film, but this picture definitely deserves one more mention.
Yup, those are cotton balls puffing out of that red sari like polka dots. Just saying, it takes a bold and confident woman to try and pull that off.
Dev Anand poses as a French jewelry importer. Can’t you tell by the beret?

Aradhana (1969)

Who can forget Rajesh Khanna’s tall Nepali hat as he bellows “Mere Sapnon Ki Rani” on a hillside?
Rajesh Khanna in a blue suit with a hot red turtleneck during “Kora Kaagaz Tha” is the epitome of suave.
Unarguably the most famous scene from Aradhana, Sharmila Tagore makes a sari out of a flimsy blanket…and the rest is history.

Bobby (1973)

Youth and freedom must mean a tight leather jacket!
Umm, ok Dimple Kapadia, where did the rest of your shirt go though?
Cute but completely arbitrary villager costume for “Jhoot Bole Kauva Kate.”

Farz (1961)

Nice ascot, Jeetendra.
Oh, those tight white pants that made you who you were. It’s no wonder Jeetendra was nicknamed “Jumping Jack”!

Prince (1969)

Did someone say “hep cat”?!
Helen and Vijayantimala dance off in “Muqabla Humse Na Karo.”

Kati Patang (1970)

Asha briefly portrays a 70s bride before running away from the ceremony.
Bindu makes a spectacle of herself in comparison to Asha’s stark white sari..

Amar Akbar Anthony (1979)

Rishi Kapoor dresses as a qawwal by night.
There actually aren’t really words for this.
Moss green pleather jacket with religious bling.
You are wearing a fedora? Clearly, you have become a millionaire.

Don (1978)

Nothing says “bad boy” like a big red bowtie.
Don’t mess with her scarf.
Or his.
Helen rocks an overly slitted dress for “Yeh Mera Dil” in Don (1978)

The bottom line here is, could Jeetendra have seized Bombay by storm without his famous tight white pants? Could Dimple Kapadia have shot to stardom without costumes that only covered half of the minimum required? Doubtful. Sure, you might not want to be caught dead in a ditch with many of these outfits, but her work is so diverse, eye-catching, and unpredictable: Mani Rabadi is unarguably genius. Next time you watch one of these hits, consider the people behind the scenes and appreciate their fluid artistry hidden within the films.

-Mrs. 55