A Beginner’s Guide to Bollywood Tree Courtship: The Best Tree Songs of Classic Films

Rajesh Khanna tree Mumtaz Aap Ki Qasam

Rajesh Khanna and Mumtaz engage in a playful treeside encounter in Aap Ki Kasam (1974).

A tree is the ideal wingman. It’s an insider trick Bollywood heroes and heroines learned early on that rarely fails to end in matrimonial bliss. Many of the best songs of Bollywood occur in a forest, taking full advantage of that lovable prop whose stability is matched only by its generosity. In honor of Van Mahotsav, the annual Indian tree-planting festival taking place this week, we too would like to honor the cultural importance of the all-mighty tree in the greatest reflection of our society: film. Why a tree? Newcomers to classic Bollywood may ask with due naivite. The archetypal significance of entering the forest–delving deep into the mysteries of the mind and soul–do have some place in the escapism of romantic fantasy, but the logic of singing and dancing around a tree is actually quite simple.

sharmila tagore kashmir ki kali

Sharmila Tagore hugs a tree for emotional stability in Kashmir Ki Kali (1964).

In most romantic-dramas of the Golden Age, emotions are just brimming over with adorable intensity. With a tree as a wingman, you can simultaneously practice your moves with a literal tree hug while catching your breath from a potentially close encounter with the real object of your desire. See, the tree doesn’t judge. The tree doesn’t ask for a return favor next Friday. The tree is neutral ground–a seemingly innocent bystander in the forest of love to which both parties have full claim. Sometimes the woman peeks behind the tree, sometimes the man. As a friendly chaperone, the tree legitimizes everyone’s behavior in that bashful innocence of bygone romance. Yes, censorship laws may prevent you from making real moves on your loved one, but they won’t stop you from snuggling a tree.

Dilip Kumar Vijayantimala dil tadap tadap ke tree

Although Vijayantimala tightly embraces a forgiving tree trunk, it’s clear who she really wants to be hugging in Madhumati (1958).

Bollywood has been perfecting the tree ritual since time immemorial. It’s a cinematic institution, particularly for the benefits of discreet pans to the sunlit treetops or a calming mountainside when a love scene threatens to quickly advance from G to PG. We even emulated basic tree positioning in a photograph on our “About Us” page!

Enjoy our list of classic Bollywood’s best tree songs below. Study them thoroughly and know your part well before embarking on your next trip to the forest. While this list could honestly go on forever, we’ve chosen our top 15 tree songs based on creativity of tree choreography. Which of YOUR favorite tree numbers would you add? Share your thoughts in the comments!

1. Dekho Kasam Se (Tumsa Nahin Dekha 1957)

2. Dil Tadap Tadap (Madhumati 1958)

3. Deewana Mastana Hua Dil (Bombai Ka Babu 1960)

4. Do Sitaron Ka Zameen (Kohinoor 1960)

5. Abhi Na Jao Chod Kar (Hum Dono 1961)

6. Isharon Isharon Mein (Kashmir Ki Kali 1964)

7. Jaiye Aap Kahan Jaayenge (Mere Sanam 1965)

8. Baharon Phool Barsao (Suraj 1966)

9. In Baharon Mei.N Akeli (Mamta 1966)

10. Likhe Jo Khat Tujhe (Kanyadaan 1968)

11. Bekhudi Mein Sanam (Haseena Maan Jayegi 1968)

12. Jaane Jaan DhoonDta (Jawani Diwani 1972)

13. Suno Kaho Suna (Aap Ki Kasam 1974)

14. Is Mod Se Jaate Hain (Aandhi 1975)

15. Tune O Rangile (Kudrat 1981)

Shammi Kapoor Dekh Kasam Se

Shammi Kapoor coyly assesses the romantic situation from the comfort of his engraved tree in Tumsa Nahin Dekha (1957).

Feeling like a pro already? Perhaps you’re ready for the big time: spitting game around a tree in the rain! Check out our compilation of Bollywood’s best monsoon songs, and you’ll be walking down the aisle in no time.

-Mrs. 55

Raat Ke Humsafar Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

S

Sharmila Tagore and Shammi Kapoor enjoy the magic of Paris at night in An Evening In Paris (1967).

“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”

This quote by Ernest Hemingway is perhaps my favorite description of Paris, the quintessential city of lights and love. Being in Paris is truly a feast for all senses, but it is an opportunity that the average citizen in 1960s India would never receive. Not in person, at least.

In the 1960s, the advent of a new escapist genre of films allowed Indian audiences to be transported to exotic cosmopolitan locales through cinema. Films like Love in Tokyo (1966) and Night in London (1967) offered Indian movie-goers the chance to catch a glimpse of foreign culture from the comfort of their seats in a movie theater. In these tourist fantasies, consistency in plot and character development was not important; the real star of the show was the international destination being featured in the film.  The lyrics and English translation that we have provided today come from one of this genre’s most well-known examples: Shakti Samanta’s An Evening in Paris (1967) starring Sharmila Tagore and Shammi Kapoor.

The soundtrack for this film, composed by Shankar-Jaikishan and penned by Shailendra/Hasrat Jaipuri, contains a number of memorable hits. Yet, in my opinion, “raat ke hamsafar stands out from the rest for its beautiful melody, poetic lyrics, and passionate rendition by Mohammed Rafi and Asha Bhonsle. This romantic duet reflects a strong Western musical influence, which is enhanced by the gorgeous strings-centered orchestration and the non-traditional modulations in Rafi and Asha’s voices.

To bring an interesting perspective that may not be known to all fans of this song, there is a story behind its making that has been narrated by Nandu Chawathe, a musician in Shankar-Jakishan’s troupe. In a tragic turn of events, composer Shankar’s mother died the same morning that a musical sitting was planned for “raat ke hamsafar.”  Jaikishan, Shammi Kapoor, and others were waiting for Shankar, but most of the group left after hearing the news under the assumption that Shankar would like to take the day off. When Shankar arrived late, he asked Nandu Chawathe why everyone had left before the sitting occurred. Shankar was angry when he realized everyone had left and canceled the sitting without telling him when it was his mother who had died. An evening sitting was rescheduled the same day. When Shankar arrived, he turned off all the lights and lit a candle, much to everyone’s surprise. He hummed the opening line of “raat ke hamsafar,” and everyone was stunned instantly. The first line of the mukhDaa was even Shankar’s own words! Shammi Kapoor approved the composition, Shailendra finished out the rest of the lyrics, and a treasured gem of Hindi film music was born.

French onion soup!

Sharmila Tagore and Shammi Kapoor snuggle in a Parisian cafe as they enjoy a late-night snack–French onion soup!

Raat Ke Humsafar: Lyrics and Translation

raat ke hamsafar thak ke ghar ko chale.n
Oh companion of the night, let us wander home wearily,
jhuumtii aa rahii hai subaah pyaar kii
as the dawn of love arrives, swaying about.
dekh kar saamne ruup kii raushnii
After encountering the light of your beauty,
phir luTii jaa rahii hai subaah pyaar kii
the dawn of love is being stolen away.

sonevaalo.n ko ha.ns kar jagaanaa bhii hai
Those who are sleeping are to be awakened with a smile.
raat ke jaagato.n ko sulaanaa bhii hai
Those who have stayed awake tonight are to be lulled to sleep.
detii hai jaagne kii sadaa saath hii
Though it also gives the call to awaken,
loriyaa.n gaa rahii hai subaah pyaar kii
this dawn of love evokes calm by singing lullabies.

raat ne pyaar ke jaam bhar kar diiye
The night has filled our wine goblets of love.
aankho.n-aankho.n se jo mai.ne tum ne piiye
You and I drank from them with our eyes.
hosh to ab talak jaa ke lauTe nahii.n
After leaving us, our consciousness has yet to return.
aur kyaa laa rahii hai subaah pyaar kii?
What else does this dawn of love have in store?

kyaa kyaa vaade hue, kis ne khaayii qasam?
What promises were made tonight? Who has sworn to new vows?
is nayii raah par ham ne rakhe qadam
Upon this new path, we have taken our first steps.
chhup sakaa pyaar kab? ham chhupaaye.n to kyaa?
When could our love be hidden? Even if we could, so what?
sab samajh paa rahii hai subaah pyaar kii
This dawn of love is able to understand everything.

raat ke hamsafar thak ke ghar ko chale.n
Oh companion of the night, let us wander home wearily,
jhuumtii aa rahii hai subaah pyaar kii
as the dawn of love arrives, swaying about.

Glossary

hamsafar: companion; thaknaa: to be tired, weary; jhuumnaa: to sway; subaah: dawn; ruup: beauty; raushnii: light; luTaa jaanaa: to be stolen away; jaagat: one who is awake; sulaanaa: to lull to sleep; sadaa: call; saath hii: also; lorii: lullaby; jaam: wine goblet; hosh: consciousness; ab talak: yet; vaadaa: promise; qasam khaanaa: to take a vow; qadam rakhnaa: to take steps; chhupaanaa: to hide; samajh paanaa: to be able to understand.

Seine

Sharmila Tagore and Shammi Kapoor float away into the night on the Seine.

As an aside, I thought that I would say a word about the time that I spent in Paris during the summer of 2011! I was fortunate enough to receive a fellowship to conduct a research internship for three months in a cancer immunology laboratory at the Institut Curie. Besides the academic opportunities presented to me in the lab, my summer in Paris was a formative experience in terms of cultural enrichment and personal growth. I always look back fondly upon the time I spent in Paris, and the memories of that summer have stayed with me ever since. In keeping with the theme of this post, a couple of my pictures of Paris by night are presented below. Enjoy! À bientôt!

-Mr. 55
Seine

An early evening view of the Seine river.

EiffelTower

Enjoying the Eiffel Tower with friends on a Parisian summer night.

Ehsaan Tera Hoga Mujhpar Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

Shammi Kapoor’s wistful gaze wins over hearts as he pines about unconditional love in Junglee (1961)

Our next translation is a truly special song from Subodh Mukherjee’s Junglee (1961): ahsaan teraa hogaa mujh par. Junglee stars Saira Banu in her debut role as a stunning Kashmiri beauty who wins over a stoic, arrogant businessman played by Shammi Kapoor. This film was instrumental in launching Saira Banu’s career as a heroine and solidifying Shammi Kapoor’s image as a charming loverboy. As an aside, this film is also noteworthy because it ushered in an era of producing mainstream Bollywood films in Eastman color!

Composed by Shankar-Jaikishan and penned by Hasrat Jaipuri, this song ranks among my all-time favorites rendered by the inimitable Mohammed Rafi. This touching melody rooted in raga Yaman Kalyan with heartfelt words expressing the beautiful struggles of unconditional love is perfectly suited for Mohammed Rafi’s delicate, velvety vocals.  Shammi Kapoor’s on-screen portrayal–especially that sensual look in his eyes–adds to Rafi’s romantic rendition.

Lata Mangeshkar has done an apt job performing a second shorter “sad” version of this song in film. Yet it somehow lacks the magic and sensual ease of Rafi’s rendition, and this might be attributed to Shankar-Jakishan’s decision to have Lata sing this song in the same “male scale” as Rafi. For more on this phenomenon, please see our previous post on the role of the soprano voice in Hindi film music here.

Please enjoy this veritable gem of Hindi film music by reading the lyrics and our English translation provided below! Until next time…

-Mr. 55

16-year-old Saira Banu makes a stunning debut alongside Shammi Kapoor in Junglee (1961)

Ehsaan Tera Hoga Mujhpar: Lyrics and Translation

ahsaan teraa hogaa mujh par
You would be granting me a favor 
dil chahtaa hai vah kahne do
if you permit me to reveal my heart’s desires. 
mujhe tum se muhabbat ho gayii hai
I have fallen in love with you. 
mujhe palko.n kii chaa.nv me.n rahne do
Please let me dwell in the shadows of your eyelashes.

tum ne mujhko ha.nsnaa sikhayaa
You taught me how to smile,
rone kahoge ro le.nge ab
yet I would cry now upon your request.
aa.nsuu kaa hamaare gham na karo
Please do not mourn for my tears.
ve bahte hai.n to bahne do
They have started to flow, so let them fall.
mujhe tum se muhabbat ho gayii hai
I have fallen in love with you.
mujhe palko.n ki chaa.nv me.n rahne do
Please let me dwell in the shadows of your eyelashes.

chaahe banaa do chaahe miTaa do
Whether you build me up or destroy me, 
mar bhii gaye to de.nge duaaye.n
I will give you my blessings even if I die. 
uD uD ke kahegii khaak sanam
Oh beloved, as they fly in the air, my ashes will say:
yah dard-e-muhabbat sahne do
“Let us bear the burden of this pain in love.”
mujhe tum se muhabbat ho gayii haii
I have fallen in love with you.
mujhe palko.n kii chaa.nv me.n rahne do
Please let me dwell in the shadows of your eyelashes.

ahsaan teraa hogaa mujh par
You would be granting me a favor. 

Glossary

ahsaan: favor; muhabbat: love; palke.n: eyelids, eyelashes; aa.nsuu: tears; gham karnaa: to mourn; bahnaa: to flow; miTaa denaa: to destroy; duaaye.n: blessings; uDnaa: to fly; khaak: ashes; sanam: beloved; dard-e-muhabbat: pain in love; sahnaa: to endure, tolerate.

Junglee (1961) showcases the beauty of the Kashmiri countryside.

The 15 Best Bollywood Rain Songs: Evolution of a Classic Genre

Rajesh Khanna and Rakhee Rain Song Bollywood

Rajesh Khanna and Rakhee express their sizzling love in the rain in Shehzada (1972).

It’s monsoon season again in India and, naturally, love is sparkling in the air. At last we present our list of the best rain songs from classic Bollywood! We all adore these moments–the iconic cuddling beneath an umbrella, the splashing around in a wet garden, or of course, Zeenat Aman in a drenched saari. It seems now that singing in the rain is the epitome of Bollywood romance, and a marvelous way to introduce a new song. But this phenomena did not occur overnight, and indeed, the meaning of rain itself in a film has shifted over the years with shifting cultural expectations. Let’s take a look at rain songs in Bollywood over the years!

Shree 420 Raj Kapoor Nargis Pyar Hua Iqrar Hua Rain Song Bollywood

Raj Kapoor and Nargis huddle close together beneath an umbrella in Shree 420 (1955).

We being in the earlier days of cinematic magic. As India awoke to freedom and liberty in the 1950s, so too did the country rapidly begin to shift gears away from pure agriculture and toward industrialization. Many of the best rain songs from that era embody a sense of wonder in urban environments and, matching the film censorship boards, an innocent just-got-struck-by love. In these songs, rain seems to act as that enchantment in the air–that driving force bringing a loved one into contact or sight. Rain too acted as that shimmering veil of restraint that both parties hesitate to cross. “Ek Ladki Bheegi Bhaagi Si” from Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi (1958) is one of the most beloved rain songs of that era!

Raj Kapoor Dum Dum Diga Diga Chhalia

Raj Kapoor prances about the city streets singing “Dum Dum Diga Diga” from Chhalia (1960).

With the advent of the 60s, came a new meaning of being caught in a rainstorm. No longer was rain an innocent effector of love at first sight, but rather a clever and well-understood pretext for full out passion. To clarify, by passion, I mean, symbolic wet dancing that means much more than actual physical contact. The Bollywood rain songs of the 60s exude a sense of joy, independence and confidence. The onset of a rainstorm had an understood implication for overt displays of affection that both parties are eager to demonstrate. Say hello to bouffant hairdos, tight and wet salwar qameezes, and men doing some very special attempts at a courtship dance.

Shammi Kapoor Dil Tera Deewana Hai Sanam Mala Sinha

Shammi Kapoor and Mala Sinha get drenched in Dil Tera Deewana Hai Sanam (1960)

Gone were the days of “Do Bigha Zameen” style agricultural celebration! While the setting of the village recurred, rain ceased to be a blessing for economic survival–instead, it brought the blessing of love between newly liberated men and woman of a new age. Check out our translation of “O Sajna Barkha Bahar” from Parakh (1960) and listen how music directors cleverly incorporated native Indian instruments into creating the sounds and moods of rain. Indeed, the trickling melodies of sitar have graced the introductions of many a great rain sequence–even famously with Ravi Shankar’s solo for Satyajit Rai’s Aparajito!

Asha Parekh Aaya Saawan Jhoom Ke

Dressed as a village belle, Asha Parekh delights in the first rain of the season in “Aaya Sawan Jhoom Ke” (1969).

At last the 70s arrived, and the Bollywood rain song explored new territory. Yes, Zeenat Aman in a wet white saari is crossing some obvious lines and certainly deserves a mention on this list, but the rain song did not merely degenerate into a male fantasy. Instead, as the political atmosphere changed, the rain song adopted a meaning to suit its people. With government dissatisfaction in the air, rain songs were (while maintaining something of a romantic undertone), also a means of escape and hope.

Jeetendra Haye Re Haye Humjoli

Jeetendra and Leena Chandavarkar exhibit some of the strangest and wildest dance moves to date in the famous rain love song of Humjoli (1970)

Did you know in the early days of cinema, rain scenes were not actually filmed in the rain? Because of the nature of unforgiving black-and-white film stock, even heavy pounding natural rain does not appear clearly in the camera–much less the gentle puhaare of many a romantic Bollywood setting. As such, the production staff needed to literally dump buckets of water or spray dozens of hoses above the set for “rain” to actually appear so on screen! So the next time you watch these songs, just imagine the total chaos going on outside the frame among the frantic, water-pouring production assistants!

Zeenat Aman sets the rain on fire in “Haye Haye Yeh Majboori” from Shor (1972).

But enough talk. Now that you know the history, here is our list in chronological order of Bollywood’s greatest rain songs! These all-time classic give an entirely new meaning to “Singin’ in the Rain!”

The Best Rain Songs of Classic Bollywood

  1. Pyar Hua Iqrar Hua (Shree 420 – 1955)
  2. Yeh Raat Bheegi Bheegi (Chori Chori – 1956)
  3. Ek Ladki Bheegi Bhagi Si (Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi – 1958)
  4. Dil Tera Deewana Hai Sanam (Dil Tera Deewana – 1960)
  5. Dum Dum Diga Diga (Chhalia -1960)
  6. O Sajna Barkha Bahar Aayi (Parakh -1960)
  7. Rim Jhim Ke Tarane (Kala Bazaar – 1960)
  8. Zindagi Bhar Nahin Bhoolegi (Barsaat Ki Raat – 1960)
  9. Chhup Gaye Saade Nazare (Do Raaste – 1969)
  10. Aaya Saawan Jhoom Ke (Aaya Saawan Jhoom Ke – 1969)
  11. Ang Lag Ja Balma (Mera Naam Joker – 1970)
  12. Haye Re Haye (Humjoli – 1970)
  13. Bheegi Bheegi Raaton Mein (Ajnabi – 1972)
  14. Paani Re Paani (Shor – 1972)
  15. Haye Haye Yeh Majboori (Roti Kapada Aur Makaan – 1974)
Rajesh Khanna Zeenat Aman Bheegi Bheegi Raaton Mein

Rajesh Khanna cuddles Zeenat Aman to keep warm in the spicy rain song “Bheegi Bheegi Raaton Mein” in Ajnabi (1974).

And there you have it, the 15 best classic Bollywood rain songs over the ages! What are YOUR favorite rain songs from classic Bollywood–and tell us how they’ve influenced your own love stories!

– Mrs. 55

Deewana Hua Badal Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

Sharmila Tagore Kashmir ki Kali

Sharmila Tagore plays a shy Kashmiri village girl in Kashmir ki Kali (1964)

Next we present the full lyrics and English translation to the jewel “Deewana Hua Badal” from Kashmir Ki Kali (1964). A beauty of beauties, “Deewaana Hua Badal” embodies the timeless dream of Kashmiri paradise. This charming duet by Mohammed Rafi and Asha Bhonsle is the highlight of the film Kashmir Ki Kali (1964), starring Shammi Kapoor and Sharmila Tagore. With a gently uplifting melody and traditional orchestration, “Deewana Hua Badal” captures a sense of pure bliss in the surroundings of the beautiful Kashmiri mountainside. Shammi Kapoor follows his lover Sharmila Tagore to the base of the famous Dal Lake where lotus flowers bloom and intricate wooden houseboats line the banks.

For centuries, Indians have been entranced by that heavenly treasure, Kashmir. Mughal emperor Jahangir famously wrote of Kashmir in the 17th century,

Gar firdaus ruhe zameen ast,
Hameen asto, hameen asto, hameen ast.”

“If there is Paradise on this Earth,
Then it is here, it is here, it is here…”

And classic Bollywood was no different. For years, all love dream sequences and the most beautiful of songs were set in Kashmir’s Shalimar gardens. Kashmir Ki Kali is but one of many films set in this paradise from that time period–before internal war and strife drove filmmakers away from Srinagar to the Swiss mountains. Being partly Kashmiri myself, I can attest to the sublimity of the countryside and what the natural beauty means to its people and history. The politics and tragedies that have plagued this gem are completely beyond the scope of this blog, but regarding its impact on Bollywood, Kashmir will remain forever the lover’s ideal.

Sharmila Tagore and Shammi Kapoor Kashmir Ki Kali Dal Lake

The famous Dal Lake of Srinagar, Kashmir is the gorgeous backdrop for “Deewana Hua Badal” from Kashmir Ki Kali (1964).

If I’m ever making a list of my favorite Bollywood songs, “Deewana Hua Badal” IS my number one choice. Since I was a little girl, this enchanting song found a special place in my heart. In fact, my own grandparents honeymooned in Srinagar by the famous Dal Lake in the early 1950s! When you listen to the sweetness of this song’s lyrics and melody, then imagine the paradise of vintage Kashmir, it’s easy to fall to in love! Please enjoy our full lyrics and English translation to “Deewana Hua Badal” below!

Deewana Hua Badal Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

Male:
Yeh dekh ke dil jhuumaa
Upon seeing her, my heart swayed
Lii pyaar ne a.NgaDaaii
And love sprang forth
Diiwaanaa huaa baadal
The clouds became mad with love
Saavan kii ghataa chhaaii
The rain clouds of Spring abounded

Aisii to merii taqdiir na thii
My fate was once not as such
Tumsaa jo koii mehboob mile
To have met a lover like you before
Dil aaj khushii se paagal hai
Today my heart is crazy with happiness
Aye jaan-e-wafaa tum khuub mile
Oh my faithful one, we met at the right time
Dil kyuu.N na bane paagal?
Why should my heart not go crazy?
Kyaa tumne adaa paaii!
What style you have!
Yeh dekh ke dil jhuumaa
Upon seeing her, my heart swayed
Lii pyaar ne a.NgaDaaii
And love sprang forth
Diiwaanaa huaa baadal
The clouds became mad with love

Female:
Jab tumse nazar takaraaii sanam
Ever since my gaze struck you
Jazabaat kaa ek tuufaan uThaa
A storm of emotions lifted within me
Tinake kii tarah mai.N Bah nikalii
Like a twig, I was swept away
Sailaab mere roke na rukaa
Despite my effort, I could not stop the flood
Jeevan mei.N machii halchal
There was a stirring in my soul
Aur bajane lagii shahanaaii
And music of the shahanaii began to play
Yeh dekh ke dil jhuumaa
Upon seeing him, my heart swayed
Lii pyaar ne a.NgaDaaii
And love sprang forth

Male
Diiwaanaa huaa baadal
The clouds became mad with love

Hai aaj naye armaano.N se
Today with new desires
Aabaad merii dil kii nagarii
The city of my heart is filled
Baraso.N se khizaa.N kaa mausam thaa
For ages it was the season of Autumn
Viiraan baDi duniyaa thi merii
My world was a barren waste
Haathon mei.N teraa aanchal
Then in my hands came the drape of your saari
Aayaa ki bahaar aayii!
And when it came, the Spring followed!
Yeh dekh ke dil jhuumaa
Upon seeing her, my heart swayed
Lii pyaar ne a.NgaDaaii
And love sprang forth

Female:
Diiwaanaa huaa baadal
The clouds became mad with love
Saavan kii ghataa chhaaii
The rain clouds of Spring abounded
Yeh dekh ke dil jhuumaa
Upon seeing him, my heart swayed
Lii pyaar ne a.NgaDaaii
And love sprang forth

Male:
Diiwaanaa huaa baadal…

Glossary

angaDaaii: a turn, a leap; diiwaanaa: crazy (in love); baadal: cloud, saawan: rain; ghataa: cloud; taqdiir: Fate; mehboob: lover; khushii: happiness; paagal: crazy; jaan-e-wafa: faithful one; nazar takraanaa: to strike a gaze; jazabaat: emotion; tuufaan: storm; tinake: twig; straw; sailaab: flood, deluge; halchal: stirring; shahanaaii: a woodwind instrument traditionally played at Indian weddings; armaan: desire; aabad: filled; nagarii: city; khizaa: Autumn; mausam: atmosphere; viraan: wasted; duniya: world; aanchal: drape of a saari or dupatta; bahar: Spring

A few notes on this translation: The word angaDaaii does not have a simple English translationPlease see our translation of Likhe Jo Khat Tujhe for further discussion of this complex word. Basically, all of those awkward stretching movements Shammi is doing in the beginning are examples of angaDaaii. Furthermore the line “deewana hua baadal…” can be interpreted in two ways! Although we have written “the clouds became mad with love,” this line could easily mean the inverse: that he who is mad with love became a cloud. This alternative meaning could make some sense–he felt so light and happy with love that he lifted up and joined the clouds. I’m not going to get carried overboard though. We will leave it up to you to decide to how interpret these famous opening lines!

Shammi Kapoor Kashmir ki Kali

Shammi Kapoor blushes and shimmies during the opening of “Deewana Hua Badal” from Kashmir Ki Kali (1964).

Some of you may question the opening performance by Shammi Kapoor in this song. Yes, he’s absurd as he comes tumbling down the stairs, bulging out of his tight clothes. Yes, his lipstick is a tad too red. And yes, you can see the line below his chin where Costumes forgot to blend his pasty white pancake foundation into his neck. But I’ve come to terms with everything Shammi is: a spastic, messy heartthrob. And since in this film, Sharmila Tagore isn’t wearing half of the sweeping cat-eyeliner that would later become her signature, someone had to wear enough make-up for the team!

– Mrs. 55