Maine Tere Liye Hi Saath Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

Rajesh Khanna plays a patient with a terminal illness and endless optimism in classic Bollywood film Anand (1971).

As the year draws to a close, the lyrics of “Maine Tere Liye Hi” from classic Bollywood film Anand (1971) seems a fitting note with which to reflect on everything that has passed. 2020 has been one of the most bizarre, tragic, and tiring years many of us have experienced. I say “many” to acknowledge that our grandparents, who actually survived far worse–whether the Partition of India or World War II–became among the greatest victims of the pandemic. As a physician, I always spend extra time with my elderly COVID patients who are alone just to talk, even when it’s hard to otherwise feel as motivated to dive into the abyss as we did in the Spring. If you haven’t called your grandparents this week, stop reading this post and call them now.

Finished your call? Did you tell them to watch The Crown and promise to eat a tablespoon of sugar before your next exam? Great. We’ll move on. “Maine Tere Liye” for me has the perfect blend of nostalgia, sorrow, and optimism to encapsulate the end of 2020. A truly must-see film (which I actually watched on zoom with a group of my non-Hindi speaking colleagues this year! A crowd-pleaser to say the least!), Anand (1971) unfolds the tale of a doctor (played by Amitabh Bachhan) whose cynicism of a failing medical system is dismantled by the joie-de-vivre of a patient (played by Rajesh Khanna) diagnosed with lymphosarcoma of the intestine. I was struck by how true Amitach Bachhan’s criticisms of healthcare delivery in 1971 India rang so painfully true in 2020 America: poor patients often cannot access the care they desperately need. Luckily, to balance out these profound, sobering thoughts, I was also struck by Rajesh Khanna’s impeccable comedic timing and, as always, his absolutely dashing good looks (why, yes, he drops his famous wink in this song so be ready to check your pulse!).

At a casual dinner party in Anand (1971), Rajesh Khanna sings for his friend Amitabh Bachhan like it’s no big deal and he just woke up with that voice.

The soundtrack of Anand is as legendary as its performances, with hits like “Zindagi Kaisi Hai Paheli” and “Kahin Door Jab Din.” “Maine Tere Liye Hi” stands out uniquely as a poem of friendship: something everyone needs in 2020. With lyrics by Yogesh and music by Salil Chaudhary, playback singer Mukesh croons about relishing in memories of the past and awaiting a better future. We dedicate this song to all of our amazing readers with whom a deep love of music and film from a bygone era brings us together. We hope our English translation of “Maine Tere Liye” offers a bright moment to your day!

Maine Tere Liye Hi Lyrics & English Translation

Maine tere liiye hii saat rang ke sapne chune
I have chosen a dream of seven colors just for you
Sapne, suriile sapne,
Dreams, beautiful dreams
Kuch ha.Nsii ke, kuch gham ke,
Some with laughter, some with sorrow
Terii ankho.N ke saaye churaaye rasiilii yaado.N ne
These rich memories have stolen shadows of your eyes
Maine tere liye hi saat rang ke…

ChhoTii baate.N
Small words…
ChhoTii chhoTii baato.N kii hai yaade.N baDIi,
Small words can leave big memories
Bhuule nahii.N biiThii huii ek chhoTii ghaDii
I haven’t forgotten even small moments that have passed
Janam janam se, aankhe.N bichaaye, tere liiye in raho.N mei.N
With every lifetime, my eyes are spread upon these paths for you
Maine tere liye hi saat rang ke…

Bhole-bhaale
Innocent
Bhole-bhaale dil ko behlate rahe
I kept amusing my innocent heart
Tanhaii mei.N tere khayalo.N ko sajaate rahe
In my loneliness, I kept adorning my thoughts of you
Kabhii kabhii to, aawaaz dekar, mujhko jagaayaa khwaabo.N ne
From time to time, my dreams called out to wake me up
Maine tere liye hi saat rang ke…

RuuThi raate.N
Upset nights
RuuThi huii raato.N ko manaayaa kabhi
Sometimes, I’m able to soothe the upset nights
Tere liye biiThii subaah ko bulaayaa kabhii
For you sometimes I call back the morning that has passed
Tere binaa bhii, tere liiye hii, diye jalaaye aaho.N ne
Ever when you are gone, for you alone, the lamps are lit by my sighs
Maine tere liye hi saat rang ke…

Glossary:

saat: seven, rang: color; sapnaa: dream; chunnaa: to choose; suriilaa: beautiful; ha.Nsii: laughter; gham: sorrow; aa.Nkh: eyes; saayaa: shadow; churaanaa: to steal; rasiilii: rich, delicious; yaade.N: memories; chhoTaa: small; baate.N: words; baDaa: big; bhuulnaa: to forget; biiThnaa: to pass; ghaDii: moment; janam: lifetime; bichaanaa: to spread, to lay; bholaa-bhaalaa: innocent, naive; dil behlaanaa: to amuse, to sweet talk; tanhaaii: loneliness; khayaal: thought: sajaanaa: to decorate, to adorn; kabhii kabhii: sometimes, occasionally; aawaaz: voice, jagaanaa: to wake up; khwaab: dream; ruuThaa: upset; raat: night; manaanaa: to placate, to soothe; subaah: morning; bulaanaa: to call; [kisii ke] binaa: without [someone]; [kisii ke] liye: for [someone]; diyaa: lamp; jalaanaa: to burn, to light: aah: sigh

Rajesh Khanna pretending to play the piano and holding the camera hostage with his smoldering gaze in Anand (1971).

This beautiful song was requested by long-time fans Prasad Sakhamuri and Sheza Iqbal. Thank you both for the very apt choice! As you’ve noticed, Mr. 55 and I have been busy in the hospitals this year, but we read all your requests and kind messages and respond as soon as we can! What classic Bollywood songs have inspired YOU in 2020? We’d love to know in the comments!

– Mrs. 55

My husband and I living large on vacation at the Shangri-La in Mauritius days before the U.S. shut its borders in March 2020. That feels like such an alternate reality now! We’ll be dreaming of that time for many months to come.

Salaam-E-Ishq Meri Jaan Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi

screen-shot-2017-12-24-at-10-33-24-pm-e1514177158319.png

Rekha nails the aadab in the introduction to salaam-e-ishq merii jaa.n from Muqaddar Ka Sikander (1978)

Today, we present the lyrics and English translation of “Salaam-E-Ishq Meri Jaan” from Muqaddar Ka Sikander (1978).

Directed by Prakash Mehra, the blockbuster film Muqaddar Ka Sikander became the third highest grossing movie of the ’70s (following Sholay and Bobby) for its mass appeal as a classic masala entertainer. With an all-star cast and a convoluted plot, the film portrays the trials and tribulations of Sikander (Amitabh Bacchan) as he navigates through life’s struggles – from an unfortunate childhood as a poor orphan to a troubled young man with a doomed love.

The soundtrack of this film, composed by the underrated duo Kalyanji-Anandji and penned by Anjaan (Lalji Pandey), was a hit when the movie released and remains popular to this day. Notable gems include rote hue aate hai.n sab by Kishore, o saathii re by Kishore/Ashaand dil to hai dil by Lata. However, the highlight of the film’s soundtrack is the Lata-Kishore duet salaam-e-ishq meri jaa.n, whose lyrics have interestingly been credited to the film’s director Prakash Mehra. Although Rekha’s role in the film is small, she shines in her performance of this mujra number and shares great on-screen chemistry with Amitabh. No one can play the sulking courtesan like Rekha can, am I right?

For the musically inclined, this song is based on Raga Yaman Kalyan with a touch of Puriya Dhanashri when Kishore sings the second antara.

This song was requested by one of our dear readers Salma – thank you! Until next time…

-Mr. 55

screen-shot-2017-12-24-at-10-35-40-pm.png

Rekha looks great, but what was Amitabh’s costume designer thinking here?

Salaam-E-Ishq Meri Jaan: Lyrics and English Translation

ishqvaalo.n se na puuchho ki unkii raat kaa aalam
Do not ask lovers about how their nights
tanhaa kaise guzartaa hai?
pass in solitude.
judaa ho hamsafar jiskaa voh usko yaad kartaa hai
Those separated from their companions reminisce about them.
na ho jis kaa koii voh milne kii fariyaad kartaa hai
Those who are alone pray to meet their beloved.

salaam-e-ishq merii jaa.n zaraa qubuul kar lo
My dear, accept these greetings of love.
tum ham se pyaar karne kii zaraa-sii bhuul kar lo
Make the small mistake of falling in love with me.
meraa dil bechain hai hamsafar ke liye
My heart is restless for a companion.

mai.n sunaauu.n tumhe.n baat ik raat kii
I shall tell you the story of one night.
chaa.nd bhii apnii puurii javaanii pe thaa
The Moon was shining in full splendor.
dil me.n tuufaan thaa, ik armaan thaa
In my heart, there was a storm, a desire.
dil kaa tuufaan apnii ravaanii pe thaa
This storm in my heart raged with full vigor.
ik baadal udhar se chalaa jhuum ke
A cloud danced its way from afar
dekhte dekhte chaa.nd par chhaa gayaa
and cast its shadow over the Moon.
chaa.nd bhii kho gaya uskii aaghosh me.n
The Moon was lost in its embrace.
uff! yeh kya ho gaya josh hii josh me.n?
Oh! What has happened amidst such passion?
meraa dil dhaDkaa
My heart beat.
meraa dil taDpaa kisii kii nazar ke liye
My heart pined for someone’s glance.

KISHORE: is ke aage kii ab daastaa.n mujh se sun
Now hear the rest of the story from me.
sun ke terii nazar Dab-Dabaa jaayegii
After hearing it, your gaze will fall.
baat dil kii jo ab tak tere dil me.n thii
The innermost thoughts that have resided in your heart,
meraa daavaa hai ho.nTho.n pe aa jaayegi
I guarantee that they will surface to your lips.
tuu masiiha muhabbat ke maaro.n kaa hai
You are the Messiah for the lovestruck.
ham tera naam sun ke chale aaye hai.n
After hearing your name, I have come to your side.
ab davaa de hame.n yaa tuu de de zahar
Now give me your medicine or give me poison.
terii mahfil me.n ye diljale aaye hai.n
Many of your admirers have arrived in this gathering.
ik ahsaan kar apne mahmaan par
Do a favor for your guests,
de.n duaaye.n
for they will give you blessings.
de.n duaaye.n tujhe umr bhar ke liye
They will give you blessings for the rest of your life.

LATA: salaam-e-ishq merii jaa.n zaraa qubuul kar lo
My dear, accept these greetings of love.

Glossary:

aalaam: condition, atmosphere; fariyaad: prayer; salaam-e-ishq: greetings of love; qubuul karnaa: to accept; bhuul: mistake; bechain: restless; hamsafar: companion; javaanii: youth, splendor; tuufaan: storm; armaan: hope, desire; ravaanii: vigor; baadal: cloud; chhaa jaanaa: to cast a shadow; aaghosh: embrace; josh: passion; taDpaanaa: to pine; daastaa.n: story; Dab-Dabaa jaanaa: to sink, fall; daavaa: promise, guarantee; masiiha: Messiah; muhabbat ke maaro.n: the lovestruck; davaa: medicine; zahar: poison; diljale: admirer; ahsaan: favor; mahmaan: guest; duaaye.n: blessings; umr bhar: life-long.

Amitabh_Rekha_SalaamEIshq_MuqaddarKaSikander

Of course, no mujra number is complete without some groveling from a drunk hero.

50 Best Film Shots That Will Make You Believe in the Magic of Bollywood

We’ve compiled a montage of the best film shots from classic Bollywood movies that we feel exemplify the splendor, allure, and excitement of Hindi movies from the Golden Age. Consider these 50 beautiful film shots a glimpse through a keyhole into a much grander world of cinematographic sublimity: watch the video below to behold the magic of classic Bollywood.

This project was kindled in part by my reaction to everyone who’s ever told me, “I love Bollywood!” I get that a lot. Being a film production major who’s worked in the Hindi movie industry, I hear the phrase, “I love Bollywood!” several times a month—from classmates, friends, and random people at parties. Bollywood has become a trend all over the globe—every hipster worth their organic sea salt is familiar with the term, and many have even seen a Hindi film or two themselves. Except I don’t really ever know what to say in reply. It’s not because loving Bollywood isn’t exactly what I look for in new friends (because believe me, it is), but because I don’t understand what that phrase even means.

Let me put this in perspective. To me, this can be the equivalent of someone in rural Punjab who’s seen the Bourne trilogy saying, “I love Hollywood!”

Think about that. What does it mean to love “Hollywood”? Are you saying you love American filmmaking and its history? Celebrity gossip? Or do you really mean to say, “I love action flicks and Matt Damon?” Because Hollywood is not just big-budget androcentric action flicks (although they are a cool part of a big genre). Ryan Gosling kissing Rachel McAdams in the rain is Hollywood. Orsen Welles fighting a smear campaign for governor is Hollywood. Judy Garland singing over a rainbow is Hollywood. And Jack Nicholas running amok in an insane asylum is Hollywood. It’s rare to find someone who knows and loves it all.

So when you say, “I love Bollywood!” to me, as a true lover of all things Bollywood, I don’t know what you’re really referring to. Often people who haven’t had much exposure tend to generalize that elusive term Bollywood to mean “pretty costumes!” or “crazy dancing!” This perception applies just as much to Indians from India as to non-Indians anywhere else. Because Bollywood is not just the melodramatic musical with half-naked women and a loose masala plot that is often stereotyped. Bollywood is Guru Dutt searching the streets of urban decay for a glimmer of humanity. Bollywood is Meena Kumari dancing kathak upon shattered glass in sorrow. Bollywood is Amitabh Bachhan’s fist meeting the jaws of his twenty adversaries with a satisfying smack. And yes, Bollywood is Aishwarya Rai and Shah Rukh Khan in glittery costumes declaring love in the moonlight. I often yearn to somehow share all the magic of classic Hindi cinema that comes to my mind when I think of Bollywood, because it is a well-hidden treasure for so many of my generation.

Now before someone throws a fit, I get it. Not everyone has the time or interest to become heavily familiarized with Bombay’s film output since the 1930s. Nor should they. All I’m saying is, I wish more people were aware of what Bollywood truly encompasses. When you exclaim, “I love Bollywood!” there is a reason why I can’t bring myself to reply, “OMG, totes!” but instead want to fill your ear with my reverence of the cinematography in Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959). Simply tell me you loved the movie Kuch Kuch Hota Hai (1998) (because, seriously, who didn’t?), or that you thought Deepika Padukone’s outfits were beautiful in that one rom-com. Otherwise, we’ll both end up feeling awkward after I start on my spiel. Yes, I probably overthink this. Yes, most people probably don’t care one way or another. But I can’t imagine living a world without the enchantment of classic Bollywood films, and maybe there are people out there who would want in, if they only knew what they’re missing.

So this montage is the reply I wish I could give everyone, but I cannot articulate–a reply that must be seen to be believed. Because when I respond, “Really? I love Bollywood too!” this is what comes to my mind. This montage is why I love Bollywood. I hope that by watching these shots, you can get a peek into that hypnotizing world yourself, and that you’ll crave more. I hope that this might be a chance to understand that Bollywood is far richer, far more complex, and far more evocative than can be summed up by mere words or by viewing a single film.

Therefore, don’t just take my word for it. Watch the 50 Film Shots That Will Make You Believe in the Magic of Classic Bollywood, and I’ll bet that somewhere deep inside your heart, something faintly stirs in a way you never knew possible. And afterwards, I recommend starting with any of the movies that made our list of the Top 30 Greatest Classic Bollywood Films of All Time. I’ll get off my soap box now. Back to translating obscure old songs where I belong. But send us a comment if this montage resonates with you, and share it with anyone who may have never experienced the wonder of the films to which it pays homage.

Just don’t even get me started on Slumdog Millionaire.

– Mrs. 55

Final Shot from Mother India Nargis

An aged Nargis remembers the trials of her youth in the final shot of the Academy Award-nominated film Mother India (1957).

As a reference, the corresponding films to our 50 selected shots are below. The music playing during the montage is the “Title Music” from Pakeezah (1972).

50 Shots’ Film Names (in order of appearance):

  1. Bandini (1963)
  2. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  3. Pakeezah (1972)
  4. Aradhana (1969)
  5. Bombai Ka Babu (1960)
  6. Kohra (1964)
  7. Mother India (1957)
  8. Guide (1965)
  9. Shree 420 (1955)
  10. Sangam (1964)
  11. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  12. Chinatown (1962)
  13. Caravan (1971)
  14. Shree 420 (1955)
  15. Shree 420 (1955)
  16. Sholay (1975)
  17. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  18. Pakeezah (1972)
  19. Pakeezah (1972)
  20. Pyaasa (1957)
  21. Bombai Ka Babu (1960)
  22. Umrao Jaan (1981)
  23. Woh Kaun Thi? (1964)
  24. Mehboob Ki Mehndi (1971)
  25. Jab Jab Phool Khile (1965)
  26. Aradhana (1969)
  27. Khamoshi (1970)
  28. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  29. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  30. Woh Kaun Thi? (1964)
  31. Mother India (1957)
  32. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  33. Guide (1965)
  34. Andaz (1949)
  35. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  36. Aradhana (1969)
  37. Pakeezah (1972)
  38. Jewel Thief (1967)
  39. Aan Milo Sajna (1970)
  40. Anand (1971)
  41. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  42. Awaara (1951)
  43. Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977)
  44. Do Raaste (1969)
  45. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  46. Awaara (1951)
  47. Sholay (1975)
  48. Baazi (1951)
  49. Woh Kaun Thi? (1964)
  50. Mother India (1957)

50 Best Film Shots That Will Make You Believe in the Magic of Classic Bollywood

 

We’ve compiled a montage of the best film shots from classic Bollywood movies that we feel exemplify the splendor, allure, and excitement of Hindi movies from the Golden Age. Consider these 50 beautiful film shots a glimpse through a keyhole into a much grander world of cinematographic sublimity: behold the magic of classic Bollywood.

This project was kindled in part by my reaction to everyone who’s ever told me, “I love Bollywood!” I get that a lot. Being a film production major who’s worked in the Hindi movie industry, I hear the phrase, “I love Bollywood!” several times a month—from classmates, friends, and random people at parties. Bollywood has become a trend all over the globe—every hipster worth their organic sea salt is familiar with the term, and many have even seen a Hindi film or two themselves. Except I don’t really ever know what to say in reply. It’s not because loving Bollywood isn’t exactly what I look for in new friends (because believe me, it is), but because I don’t understand what that phrase even means.

Let me put this in perspective. To me, this can be the equivalent of someone in rural Punjab who’s seen the Bourne trilogy saying, “I love Hollywood!”

Think about that. What does it mean to love “Hollywood”? Are you saying you love American filmmaking and its history? Celebrity gossip? Or do you really mean to say, “I love action flicks and Matt Damon?” Because Hollywood is not just big-budget androcentric action flicks (although they are a cool part of a big genre). Ryan Gosling kissing Rachel McAdams in the rain is Hollywood. Orsen Welles fighting a smear campaign for governor is Hollywood. Judy Garland singing over a rainbow is Hollywood. And Jack Nicholas running amok in an insane asylum is Hollywood. It’s rare to find someone who knows and loves it all.

So when you say, “I love Bollywood!” to me, as a true lover of all things Bollywood, I don’t know what you’re really referring to. Often people who haven’t had much exposure tend to generalize that elusive term Bollywood to mean “pretty costumes!” or “crazy dancing!” This perception applies just as much to Indians from India as to non-Indians anywhere else. Because Bollywood is not just the melodramatic musical with half-naked women and a loose masala plot that is often stereotyped. Bollywood is Guru Dutt searching the streets of urban decay for a glimmer of humanity. Bollywood is Meena Kumari dancing kathak upon shattered glass in sorrow. Bollywood is Amitabh Bachhan’s fist meeting the jaws of his twenty adversaries with a satisfying smack. And yes, Bollywood is Aishwarya Rai and Shah Rukh Khan in glittery costumes declaring love in the moonlight. I often yearn to somehow share all the magic of classic Hindi cinema that comes to my mind when I think of Bollywood, because it is a well-hidden treasure for so many of my generation.

Now before someone throws a fit, I get it. Not everyone has the time or interest to become heavily familiarized with Bombay’s film output since the 1930s. Nor should they. All I’m saying is, I wish more people were aware of what Bollywood truly encompasses. When you exclaim, “I love Bollywood!” there is a reason why I can’t bring myself to reply, “OMG, totes!” but instead want to fill your ear with my reverence of the cinematography in Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959). Simply tell me you loved the movie Kuch Kuch Hota Hai (1998) (because, seriously, who didn’t?), or that you thought Deepika Padukone’s outfits were beautiful in that one rom-com. Otherwise, we’ll both end up feeling awkward after I start on my spiel. Yes, I probably overthink this. Yes, most people probably don’t care one way or another. But I can’t imagine living a world without the enchantment of classic Bollywood films, and maybe there are people out there who would want in, if they only knew what they’re missing.

So this montage is the reply I wish I could give everyone, but I cannot articulate–a reply that must be seen to be believed. Because when I respond, “Really? I love Bollywood too!” this is what comes to my mind. This montage is why I love Bollywood. I hope that by watching these shots, you can get a peek into that hypnotizing world yourself, and that you’ll crave more. I hope that this might be a chance to understand that Bollywood is far richer, far more complex, and far more evocative than can be summed up by mere words or by viewing a single film.

Therefore, don’t just take my word for it. Watch the 50 Film Shots That Will Make You Believe in the Magic of Classic Bollywood, and I’ll bet that somewhere deep inside your heart, something faintly stirs in a way you never knew possible. And afterwards, I recommend starting with any of the movies that made our list of the Top 30 Greatest Classic Bollywood Films of All Time. I’ll get off my soap box now. Back to translating obscure old songs where I belong. But send us a comment if this montage resonates with you, and share it with anyone who may have never experienced the wonder of the films to which it pays homage.

Just don’t even get me started on Slumdog Millionaire.

– Mrs. 55

Final Shot from Mother India Nargis

An aged Nargis remembers the trials of her youth in the final shot of the Academy Award-nominated film Mother India (1957).

As a reference, the corresponding films to our 50 selected shots are below. The music playing during the montage is the “Title Music” from Pakeezah (1972).

50 Shots’ Film Names (in order of appearance):

  1. Bandini (1963)
  2. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  3. Pakeezah (1972)
  4. Aradhana (1969)
  5. Bombai Ka Babu (1960)
  6. Kohra (1964)
  7. Mother India (1957)
  8. Guide (1965)
  9. Shree 420 (1955)
  10. Sangam (1964)
  11. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  12. Chinatown (1962)
  13. Caravan (1971)
  14. Shree 420 (1955)
  15. Shree 420 (1955)
  16. Sholay (1975)
  17. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  18. Pakeezah (1972)
  19. Pakeezah (1972)
  20. Pyaasa (1957)
  21. Bombai Ka Babu (1960)
  22. Umrao Jaan (1981)
  23. Woh Kaun Thi? (1964)
  24. Mehboob Ki Mehndi (1971)
  25. Jab Jab Phool Khile (1965)
  26. Aradhana (1969)
  27. Khamoshi (1970)
  28. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  29. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  30. Woh Kaun Thi? (1964)
  31. Mother India (1957)
  32. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  33. Guide (1965)
  34. Andaz (1949)
  35. Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
  36. Aradhana (1969)
  37. Pakeezah (1972)
  38. Jewel Thief (1967)
  39. Aan Milo Sajna (1970)
  40. Anand (1971)
  41. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  42. Awaara (1951)
  43. Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977)
  44. Do Raaste (1969)
  45. Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959)
  46. Awaara (1951)
  47. Sholay (1975)
  48. Baazi (1951)
  49. Woh Kaun Thi? (1964)
  50. Mother India (1957)

Everything I Need to Know About Life, I Learned From Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977)

Everything I need to know about life I learned from Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977).

We at Mr. and Mrs. 55 – Classic Bollywood Revisited! are getting tired of some of the recent unhinged political rhetoric being thrown around. Sometimes we have to take a moment to realize that not everyone was lucky enough to learn important life lessons as we were from classic Bollywood films.

Amar Akbar, Anthony (1977) is one of India’s most beloved masala films, telling the story of three brothers who are separated in childhood and eventually united after one is raised a Hindu, one a Muslim, and one a Christian. Let’s take a moment to reflect on what Vinod Khanna, Rishi Kapoor, and Amitabh Bachhan’s title characters would have to say about recent events.

3 Life Lessons From Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977):

1. We CAN all live in harmony.

Amar akbar anthony

Plurality makes us better. Families, communities, and countries are enriched because we embrace and learn from our differences.

2. A family that sings and dances together, stays together.

anthony gonsalves egg

On a related note, always, always have a giant Easter egg handy. Just trust me.

3. Karma is a b****.

Pran Amar Akbar Anthony

A really huge b****. If you insult a man when he’s down, you’re going to be that man soon. And everyone, even your kids, will hate you. Until, of course, you repent and join them in a group chorus (see rule #2).

Pass this along to friends, shady pharmaceutical executives, and bombastic political wannabes who don’t quite get it. And if your childhood was completely empty, you can now watch Amar, Akbar, Anthony online and subtitled here!

Your welcome.

– Mrs. 55