Everything I Need to Know About Life, I Learned From Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977)

Everything I need to know about life I learned from Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977).

We at Mr. and Mrs. 55 – Classic Bollywood Revisited! are getting tired of some of the recent unhinged political rhetoric being thrown around. Sometimes we have to take a moment to realize that not everyone was lucky enough to learn important life lessons as we were from classic Bollywood films.

Amar Akbar, Anthony (1977) is one of India’s most beloved masala films, telling the story of three brothers who are separated in childhood and eventually united after one is raised a Hindu, one a Muslim, and one a Christian. Let’s take a moment to reflect on what Vinod Khanna, Rishi Kapoor, and Amitabh Bachhan’s title characters would have to say about recent events.

3 Life Lessons From Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977):

1. We CAN all live in harmony.

Amar akbar anthony

Plurality makes us better. Families, communities, and countries are enriched because we embrace and learn from our differences.

2. A family that sings and dances together, stays together.

anthony gonsalves egg

On a related note, always, always have a giant Easter egg handy. Just trust me.

3. Karma is a b****.

Pran Amar Akbar Anthony

A really huge b****. If you insult a man when he’s down, you’re going to be that man soon. And everyone, even your kids, will hate you. Until, of course, you repent and join them in a group chorus (see rule #2).

Pass this along to friends, shady pharmaceutical executives, and bombastic political wannabes who don’t quite get it. And if your childhood was completely empty, you can now watch Amar, Akbar, Anthony online and subtitled here!

Your welcome.

– Mrs. 55

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Everything I Need to Know About Life, I Learned From Amar, Akbar, Anthony (1977)

  1. Seriously one of the best posts! I think all these news networks ought to see this and we should pass it along to Modi because he also seems to have forgotten the message.

  2. Thank you for this post. Amar Akbar Anthony was a formative part of my childhood, (and remains a touchstone, for me as well… It warms my heart to know others feel the same! But what about doing the lyrics/translation for one of the triple A songs?

  3. You, and millions more like you, will ensure that our country will continue to meander along despite a few nut cases in sphere of life.

    Sanjay Somani

  4. I saw it as a 10 year old, what an awakening it was It also taught me:
    1] How far ahead of its time it was, with the opening showing 3 people at once donating blood to one person

    2] How the beauty of Parveen Babi could stop my heart beating momentarily

    3] The hypocritical nature of Religious people, Rishi to Mukri

    Rishi: hamko hai maalum kisi se, kisi se
    chupkar ye bhi milta hai
    main naam bataau
    mu: na ji, na ji, na ji

    4] That if you were as cool as Rishi Kapoor you could “satisfy” your lady just singing to her
    “Khafa Hoke Chehara Chhupa Le, Magar Yaad Rakh Husn-Waale
    Jo Hai Aag Teri Jawani, Meraa Pyar Hai Sarz Paani
    Main Tere Gusse Ko Thanda Na Kar Dun To
    Akbar Mera Nam Nahin Hai
    Parda Hai Parda…”

    (feel free to translate the above)

    There is a full 344 page book on this film written by 3 Harvard Professors: Discussing
    “the film’s sunny exterior only partially conceals darker elements: the shadow of Partition, the crisis of Emergency Rule, and the vexed implications of the metaphor of the family for the nation.”

    http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674504486

    My this is such a multiply facetted, deep film but overall, what an incredibally joyous film this was

  5. About the blood donor scene at the beggining of the film: Checkout the symbolism of a Muslim, Christian and Hindu literally giving their blood to a Mother Earth /India figure (Nirupa Roy) to sustain and bring her life.

    That married with Rafi’s divine voice and the credits showing the mixture of cast and crew from all religions, may show that in many ways the 70s were a more tolerant, multi cultural times in India

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s