Buried Treasure: Bollywood Songs with Hidden Stanzas

Bollywood record LP

My sweet Bollywood LP record collection.

You know how it is when you grow up listening to a song. Your mom played it on cassettes in the car, your Dad sang it while he worked, and eventually that gem from the 60s sneaks into your personal playlists when you buy an ipod. It’s all fine and dandy until years later, you’re browsing along youtube and BAM! A miracle occurs.

Turns out that song you knew and loved is only AN ABBREVIATED VERSION! The song as it’s played in the film is a whole stanza, a whole musical interlude and a half longer than you ever realized! There are few things on Earth that have the same feeling of win. It give you a rare, blissful tingle all over that can otherwise only be found by watching the wink sequence of a Rajesh Khanna film.

But why, you ask? It’s simple. Unlike now when the film soundtrack hits the iTunes store and you can download your songs one at a time, back in the good old days, marketing had to squeeze an entire soundtrack onto a single LP record (typically about 15-25 minutes per side). And if you planned on selling two hit film soundtracks on the same LP to increase sales, you could forget about musical fidelity. Something had to give.

Rajesh Khanna Farida Jalal Aradhana 3

Rajesh Khanna and Farida Jalal get sassy in the uncut version of “Baaghon Mei.N Bahaar Hai” from Aradhana (1969)

The result? Dozens of priceless compositions were slashed completely, and others had pieces ripped out from their insides to fit the needs of a hungry consumer market. Maybe I’m being melodramatic but I feel really strongly about this. Several hidden classical compositions from even the musical legend Pakeezah got shafted completely. Later as technology improved, recordings were taken from the LP versions and sold as cassettes, CDs, and mP3s. The originals can now often be found only in the films themselves or in the archives.

This is the face that got cut from “Baagho.N Mei.N Bahaar Hai.” Rajesh Khanna stars as an Indian Air Force pilot in Aradhana (1969). Are you sure it wasn’t the Navy though? Because I think I see a DREAM BOAT.

Here is a growing list of songs that over the years I’ve found are secretly much longer than I once thought:

  1. Kahin Dur Jab Din Dhal Jaaye (a whole beautiful poetic stanza is cut from the end)
  2. Piya Tose Naina (the ENTIRE magical 1965 Lata Mangeshkar opening is not in the soundtrack version–BIG travesty)
  3. In Bahaaro.N Mei.N Akelii (a whole stanza)
  4. Baaghon Mei.N Bahaar Hai (Rafi’s great comeback stanza)
  5. Aaj Kal Mei.N Dhal Gayaa (in the film, the male and female version are combined in a fabulous way)
  6. Jhumka Gira Re (a whole extra stanza and some sweet prelude music)
  7. Honton Pe Aisi (one minute of introductory dance music that is a huge game-changer)
  8. Aye Gulbadan (lost a final stanza)
  9. Thare Rahiyo (there’s a great musical a moment in the middle that gets totally cut)
  10. Dekhi Zamaane Ki Yaari (random parts are missing–granted the full thing is like 10 minutes, but it’s so worth it)
  11. Dil Ka Bhanwar Kare Pukar (an entire stanza!)
  12. Dum Maro Dum (maybe this doesn’t get cut per se, but there’s a whole reprise version that gets a huge shaft in the soundtrack!)
  13. Ghar Aayaa Mera Pardesi (all the epic dream sequence music at the end)
  14. Kahin Deep Jale Kahin Dil (missing a bunch of creepy-cool interlude music. Also anyone notice the violins play an octave lower in the film? Weird.)
  15. Khwab Ho Tum Ya (the final stanza)
  16. Koi Nazaraaane Lekar (another whole stanza)
  17. Sau Saal Pehle (a great stanza at the end!)
  18. Tujhe Jeevan Ki Dor Se (missing a culmination stanza)
  19. Tu Jahaa.N Jahaa.N Chalega (how could you cut out Lata in her prime?!)
  20. Tera Phoolo.N Jaise Rang (at least a minute worth of dance music from the end that really sets the mood!)
  21. Pal Bhar Ke Liye Koi (the sassy final stanza that puts everything into perspective!)
  22. Jhoom Jhoom Dhalti Raat (the clutch stanza that has the meaning of “Kohra” explained therefore making it the title song–but you’d never have known!)

Mess with my songs? You just watch yourself.

So you can see, it’s a mix of all-time classics and the more obscure gems. No one is safe. I beg of you to add any more you know of that are missing. Perhaps this compilation can help a fellow sufferer in need see the light!

-Mrs. 55

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22 thoughts on “Buried Treasure: Bollywood Songs with Hidden Stanzas

  1. Your list is genius and it is true when when one hears a new stanza or a new number from an old beloved movie it truely brings out the cliche of “discovering a rare gem hidden in an old closet that you hadn’t noticed before.” It is extremely satisfying and even more worthy than the originals.

  2. That’s great research into old Bollywood songs! It shows your passion for classic Bollywood. I think that sometimes the last stanza is relevant only in the film because it contains the continuation of the plot after the song. That is why it is not included in the audio version of the song. I agree that it’s a great feeling to discover that last part of the song that you did not know existed. It’s just like getting sad when a great Broadway musical comes to an end and then getting excited when the actors perform a final musical piece after they bow to the audience.

  3. Pingback: Pal Bhar Ke Liye Koi Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi « Mr. & Mrs. 55 – Classic Bollywood Revisited!

  4. This was a great post! Thanks for writing on a topic that throws such light on the hidden gems of Hindi film music.
    The coveted ‘extra stanzas’ are always the more liked ones ,for me. Somehow theres always this feeling that this was the BEST stanza, for heaven’s sake…how could they cut it off in the LPs. I guess I would have felt the same sentiments for whatever stanza they would have cut off . Its the shortage that makes them more precious.

    • From years and years of observation! It’s a list I’ve been compiling based on songs I owned on cassette, CD or LP that have a different form when I see them in the movie. If you’ve got any others to add, please let us know!

      • You know there is one song which never fails to tug at my heart strings-Woh jab yaad aaye bahut yaad aaye.’Parasmani’ I think. How about unearthing some trivia about that. Rafi’s voice is sublime there! Also interestingly I haven’t yet seen any post of yours on the absolutely magical songs picturized on wooden-faced Rajendra Kumar…………..

  5. What about songs being cut from the films as well… Two Lata gems – hume kaash tumse mohabbat na hoti and Ae ishq yeh sab duniyawale, were cut from the films as well.. Only a few DVDs have them. Besides, you have them on youtube as well. Many theatres did not play these two songs even when the film was originally released in 1960. In 2004, even Mohabbat ki Jhooothi was cut in the first one week.

  6. Pingback: Shokh Nazar Ki Bijliyan Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi | Mr. & Mrs. 55 - Classic Bollywood Revisited!

  7. Hi Mr. & Mrs. 55, I also happen to be a big big big big big fan of Purana Din Ke Filmi Gaane…am completely blown away by your insightful and in-depth translations of some of my all-time favourite classics, especially Tu Jahan Jahan Chalega, Mera Saaya Saath Hoga by the one and only Lataji…
    …I am very very new to your blog but this post is an instant favourite! I feel very much the same way with many of the examples that you’ve stated, especially Lataji’s Piya Tose Naina Laage Re. I have had similar encounters as well, which I am oh so tempted to share with you:

    1. Man Dole Mera Tan Dole, the evergreen Lata solo from Nandlal-Jaswantlal’s 1954 blockbuster Nagin, composed by Hemant Kumar, lacks several priceless segments of the haunting Been music in between the lyrics. As such, the film version is considerably longer but owing to the poorly-preserved condition of this classic film, the complete version of Man Dole Mera Tan Dole is somewhat rendered incomplete over time. Also, the LP version of the film’s last song, Oonchi Oonchi Duniya Ke Deewarein ends with a fade, whereas the film version sports a handsome finish of the lavish tabla-dholak fest that accentuates Vyjayanthimala’s fine Manipuri dance extravaganza…

    2. Humein Kash Tumse Mohabbat Na Hoti, another Lata solo, this time composed by Naushad, from K Asif’s 1960 historical epic romance Mughal-E-Azam, lacks the plaintive shehnai intro found in the film. The same can be said of the fine instrumental piece played during the scene where the Krishna Jayanti celebrations are taking place in the palace, before the intro of the film’s first Lata solo Mohe Panghat Pe, and not to mention the highly dramatic instrumental piece that accompanies Gopi Krishna’s intense Kathak piece at the end of yet another Lata solo, Jab Raat Hai Aisi Matwaali…finally, the film’s last Lata solo Khuda Nigehban Ho Tumhara is a bit of a strange case: in the original 1960 OST, the song does not contain the initial lines “Woh Aayi Subaha Ke Parde Se Maut Ki Awaaz/Kisi Ne Tod Diya Jaise Zindagi Ka Saaz” as well as the foreboding bell-rings and intro music, but in the 2004 Re-release edition of the film’s enhanced OST, the very same song lacks a whole stanza found in the 1960 OST, which is by the way absent in both the original and fully-colourised versions of the Mughal-E-Azam, but contains the aforementioned initial lines! How strange!

    3. Jaiye Aap Kahan, a sweet Asha Bhosle solo composed by OP Nayyar and picturised on Asha Parekh in the 1965 film Mere Sanam, lacks a whole stanza in the middle, too

    4. Aaja Tu Raja Aaja, an Asha Bhosle-Sudha Malhotra jugalbandi composed by C. Ramachandra and picturised on Padmini and Vyjayanthimala respectively from the 1958 film Raj Tilak, a Hindi remake of the Tamil swashbuckling historical romance Vanjikottai Valiban; the LP recording does not include the elaborate instrumental piece that accompanies the rest of Padmini and Vyjayanthimala’s formidable dance-off.

    5. Jaanewale Se Mulaqat, a Lata solo composed by Naushad from Mehboob Khan’s 1954 Dilip Kumar-Madhubala starrer Amar, lacks the dramatic instrumental intro found in the film version…

    6. Meri Aankhon Mein Bas Gaya Koi Re, an early Lata solo composed by then-debutant composer duo Shanker-Jaikishen from Raj Kapoor’s second directorial venture Barsaat, lacks the tranquil instrumental piece against the backdrop of Lake Dal in the film and not to mention Lataji’s sweet humming and “Ho…ooo”. Another Lata solo, Jiya Beqarar Hai does not contain the sweet fading instrumental bit found in the film. The titular track Barsaat Mein…, lacks a whole stanza as well, and finally, a Lata solo picturised on Nimmi, Prem Nagar Mein Basnewale, is missing from the OST…

    7. most studio recordings of Na Koi Umang Hai, the evergreen Lata solo composed by Panchamda from Shakti Samanta’s 1970 drama film Kati Patang, lack the dramatic instrumental strings intro found in the film…

    8. Lag Jaa Gale, another evergreen Lata solo, this time composed by Madan Mohan from Raj Khosla’s 1964 Lady in White remake Woh Kaun Thi?, lacks the intro where Lata sings “La Jaa Gale…hmmmmm…hansee raat…hmmmmm-mmmm” found in the film…

    9. Shaam Hui Chadh Aayi Re Badariya, a Lata solo composed by Rajesh Roshan from the 1985 film Aakhir Kyon?, is less than 3 minutes long whereas the film version exceeds 4 minutes…obviously a missing stanza…

    …there are a couple of others which I cannot remember at the moment, but I am really looking forward to hear your reply on my comment as I believe this is a “sore point” in the otherwise near-to-perfect world of vintage filmi music that we both have in common!

    P/s I would also love to take this opportunity to request for a translation of Ek Meethi Si Chuban and Tu Chanda Main Chandni, both Lata solos picturised on Waheeda Rehman and composed by Jaidev from the 1971 desert saga Reshma Aur Shera, as well as another Lata solo Jo Humne Dastaan this time from Raj Khosla’s Woh Kaun Thi?, picturised on Sadhana and composed by Madan Mohan. Many thanks! 🙂

    love from Malaysia,
    Gaby

  8. Wow! Even I feel too elated when I find the missing stanza. I used to feel like i’m crazy and this sort of elation must be abnormal, but now I came to know that it’s normal!
    Recently I saw Mera Saaya and I found the missing Jhumka Gira Re stanza and felt very much surprised.
    Another additions:
    1. Nainon Mein Badra Chhaye (Mera Saaya) lacks the last ending music which adds even more grace to the song and I rewinded the part twice to listen to this melodious ending to a beautiful song.
    2. Nainon Wali Ne (Mera Saaya) lacks a whole stanza and some cool interlude music.
    Looks as if Mera Saaya songs were the worst hit by this thing!
    3. Shokh Nazar Ki Bijliyan (Woh Kaun Thi?) soundtrack lacks the middle stanza and the interesting part is that the film itself lacks the final stanza where Manoj Kumar sees the spooky-white-sari-clad Sadhna as soon as the last interlude ends and the words never come up!!!
    4. Holi Ke Din (Sholay) was exactly halved! I had to surf the net for about half an hour to download the complete song!

    Jhoom Jhoom Dhalti Raat’s last stanza…do u mean
    ‘Jisko koi samjhe na, Baat na woh dohra,
    Mera tera jeevan kya, Chhaya hua Kohra’?
    I actually have this stanza!

    And I guess I even have the baghon Mein Bahar hai’s Rafi’s comeback stanza where at last Rajesh Khanna tricks the heroine in saying ‘haan’ to ‘tumko mujhse pyar hai’.

    Eagerly awaiting your reply.

  9. Pingback: Yeh Mera Prem Patra Lyrics and Translation: Let’s Learn Urdu-Hindi | Mr. & Mrs. 55 - Classic Bollywood Revisited!

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